President Obama Visits Miami for Earth Day

Celebrating Earth Day with New Steps to Protect People, Places and Local Economies from Climate Change

[Yesterday], in celebration of Earth Day, President Obama [visited] the Florida Everglades, where rising seas and other climate change impacts are endangering one of the nation’s most iconic landscapes – and increasing risks to the State’s $82 billion tourism economy. To coincide with the President’s trip, the Administration is highlighting the value of special and vulnerable places like the Everglades and announcing new steps to protect the people and places climate change puts at risk.

While in the Everglades, President Obama walked the Anhinga Trail and addressed the assembled group. In his speech, and in the earlier press release, President Obama outlined eight “new actions to protect our national parks and our public lands, and the communities that rely on them.”

  • Calculating the Value of National Parks Tourism to the U.S. Economy
  • Calculating the Value of National Parks for Storing Carbon
  • Investing in National Parks
  • Designating a New National Historic Landmark Near the Everglades
  • Designating National Park Week
  • Providing a Flood Mapping Tool to Help Communities Prepare for Storms
  • Making Key Landscapes Resilient to Climate Change
  • Partnering with farmers, ranchers and forest land owners to reduce GHG emissions
"In the words of Marjory Stoneman Douglas, who helped preserve this land: “There are no other Everglades in the world.” But part of the reason we’re here is because climate change is threatening this treasure and the communities that depend on it, which includes almost all of south Florida. And if we don’t act, there may not be an Everglades as we know it." {Susan Walsh|AP Photo)
“In the words of Marjory Stoneman Douglas, who helped preserve this land: “There are no other Everglades in the world.” But part of the reason we’re here is because climate change is threatening this treasure and the communities that depend on it, which includes almost all of south Florida. And if we don’t act, there may not be an Everglades as we know it.” (Susan Walsh|AP Photo)
"Now, they’re all here and we’re all here because this 1.5 million acres is unlike any place on Earth.  It’s no wonder that over a million people visited last year alone.  The sawgrass prairies and mangrove forests are home to an incredible diversity of wildlife -- bald eagles, herons, hundreds of plant species, from pine trees to wild orchids.  Believe it or not, south Florida is the only place in the world where you can find both alligators and crocodiles in the same habitat.  I’m told this is a good thing." (Official White House Photo|Pete Souza)
“Now, they’re all here and we’re all here because this 1.5 million acres is unlike any place on Earth. It’s no wonder that over a million people visited last year alone. The sawgrass prairies and mangrove forests are home to an incredible diversity of wildlife — bald eagles, herons, hundreds of plant species, from pine trees to wild orchids. Believe it or not, south Florida is the only place in the world where you can find both alligators and crocodiles in the same habitat. I’m told this is a good thing.” (Official White House Photo|Pete Souza)
"And here in the Everglades, you can see the effect of a changing climate.  As sea levels rise, salty water from the ocean flows inward.  And this harms freshwater wildlife, which endangers a fragile ecosystem.  The saltwater flows into aquifers, which threatens the drinking water of more than 7 million Floridians.  South Florida, you’re getting your drinking water from this area, and it depends on this.  And in terms of economic impact, all of this poses risks to Florida’s $82 billion tourism industry on which so many good jobs and livelihoods depend." (Susan Walsh|AP Photo)
“And here in the Everglades, you can see the effect of a changing climate. As sea levels rise, salty water from the ocean flows inward. And this harms freshwater wildlife, which endangers a fragile ecosystem. The saltwater flows into aquifers, which threatens the drinking water of more than 7 million Floridians. South Florida, you’re getting your drinking water from this area, and it depends on this. And in terms of economic impact, all of this poses risks to Florida’s $82 billion tourism industry on which so many good jobs and livelihoods depend.” (Susan Walsh|AP Photo)
"2014 was the planet’s warmest year on record.  Fourteen of the 15 hottest years on record have all fallen in the first 15 years of this century.  Yes, this winter was cold in parts of our country, including Washington.  Some people in Washington helpfully used a snowball to illustrate that fact.  But around the world, in the aggregate, it was the warmest winter ever recorded." (Lynne Sladky|AP Photo)
“2014 was the planet’s warmest year on record. Fourteen of the 15 hottest years on record have all fallen in the first 15 years of this century. Yes, this winter was cold in parts of our country, including Washington. Some people in Washington helpfully used a snowball to illustrate that fact. But around the world, in the aggregate, it was the warmest winter ever recorded.” ( Lynne Sladky|AP Photo)
"Here in the Everglades, we’ve already invested $2.2 billion in restoration efforts.  With the support of some outstanding members of Congress, I’ve proposed another $240 million this year.  We want to restore the natural water flow of the Everglades, which we know is one of the best defenses against climate change and rising sea levels." (Susan Walsh|AP Photo)
“Here in the Everglades, we’ve already invested $2.2 billion in restoration efforts. With the support of some outstanding members of Congress, I’ve proposed another $240 million this year. We want to restore the natural water flow of the Everglades, which we know is one of the best defenses against climate change and rising sea levels.” (Susan Walsh|AP Photo)

Click here for a transcript of President Obama’s remarks

Click here for today’s complete press release

Published byMelanieDawn

Melanie Dawn Molina Wood is a Miami native currently living in the historic downtown district. She has earned her LEED Green Associate accreditation, the NAR GREEN designation, and an Eco-broker credential. She is also a proud member of the US Green Building Council – Miami Chapter, and a member of the Sierra Club. For more information about sustainability in Miami, or to connect with a real estate agent anywhere in the world, contact Melanie Dawn by text/phone at 305.801.3133, or by email at MelanieDawn@MelanieinMiami.com

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